Applying with a guarantor or sponsor is great for applicants who don’t have proof of income like ITR and Bank Certificate. If you have a family member living in Japan, ask them if they can be your guarantor for your Japan visa application.

Guarantor’s documents also help increase the chances of your visa approval.

You can also download the checklist here.

In addition to the basic requirements, make sure to obtain the following from your relative or family member.

  • Birth certificate of the guarantor/sponsor family member. To attest relationship of applicant and guarantor.
  • Invitation Letter. Completed and signed by the guarantor. Download here for English or here for Japanese.
  • Documents explaining the reason for the invitation. If visiting because of health reason, checkup, wedding invitation, etc. Provide copies of each.
  • Guarantee Letter. Completed and signed by the guarantor. Download here for English or here for Japanese.
  • Family Registration or koseki tohon. Must be issued within 3 months.
  • Residence Certificate or juminhyo. Must be issued within 3 months.
  • Proof of Income. Provide more than one of the following documents:
    • Income Certificate or shotoku shomeisho. Must be issued within 3 months. This can be obtained from the city hall of the persons place of residence, issued by a tax officer director.
    • Final tax return certificate or nouzeishomeisho (Form 2). Should indicate gross income for the previous year and seal of reception from the tax office. Statement of tax withholding is not acceptable. If e-Tax: submit Receipt Notification and Final Tax Return)
    • Bank Certificate or kakuteishinkokusho hikae or yokin zandaka shomeisho.
  • IF the guarantor/sponsor is a foreign national living in Japan, submit these additional documents:
    • Photocopy of valid residence card. Both sides.
    • Photocopy of resident Record Code. This can be requested from the city hall where the foreign guarantor/sponsor live.
    • Photocopy of his/her passport. Must include the pages of status items, the record of entry/departure, and of residence permit.

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Published by Ada W.

Ada moved to Japan in 2014 as a result of her husband's deployment. A former assistant language teacher who's been exploring Tokyo and Kanagawa Prefectures slowly. She hopes to uncover other regions of Japan. View more posts